Things We’d Like to See In American Horror Story: Freak Show

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The premiere of American Horror Story: Freak Show was definitely full of promise: we were introduced to many unique and interesting characters, two primary plots (the murder investigation and Twisty the Clown’s rampage) were set up, and we got to see Jessica Lange seeing a David Bowie song in a run-down sideshow tent. But there is still plenty that American Horror Story: Freak should cover offer, and these are just some of the things we’d love to see in the upcoming episodes.

More focus on the real sideshow entertainers and their talents
Many of the extras in the show are actual sideshow entertainers who were hired by the production team. This is nothing new—everything from the controversial Tod Browning film ‘Freaks’ to more recent fares like Carnivale have hired people with sideshow experience to make the productions more authentic. American Horror Story: Freak Show should definitely take advantage of this great opportunity to showcase the talents and experiences of these real people. The show has already done well by releasing interviews with these actors, and showcasing them in the show itself is the best logical step.

More out-there songs
There is nothing quite like seeing Jessica Lange dressed up as David Bowie singing “Life on Mars” in a sideshow tent. Some of the show’s best moments—Name Game, anyone?—have been musical, and Freak Show is the perfect opportunity for the show to have some great musical numbers. There have already been some glimpses of more music in the season preview, but we hope American Horror Story won’t shy away from the “show” part of the side show.

More moral ambiguity
Part of the “horror” of American Horror Story has always been that horror can be found in the most normal of places—including people themselves. It’s not always witches or ghosts or old Nazi doctors who do evil things. It would be interesting for the show to introduce greater moral ambiguity in the characters, especially those who are working at the sideshow. Too much “evil” and not enough “good” can make the show a bit boring; it also makes it difficult for the audience to connect or relate to characters, which can hamper the viewing experience. The best opportunity for ambiguity lies with the characters working at the sideshow; hopefully, the writers will make the most of it.


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