Scrubs

Share This Post
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Medical shows are a dime a dozen most of the time.  They are also usually very serious about what is happening.  People’s lives are at stake here, they have serious medical problems and it is up to the characters on the show to make things better for them.  Not so with Scrubs, a new twist on the old concept of the medical show.

kinopoisk.ruThere is a pun here, with the title, that has the double meaning where not only do the lowly medical interns where scrubs to do their work but also they are scrubs, a term denoting a lower rank on the social order within the medical community.  That is a source for a lot of the comedy on the show and it is fun to laugh at the antics of the cast members, who were obviously having a gloriously good time while on the show.

Chemistry, of course, was a must for the Scrubs’ cast.  Zack Graff is great as JD and his frequent daydreams are hilarious.  He and Chris Turk, played by Donald Faison, are one of the best comic duos in television history.  For real.  I don’t think that is too big a stretch to say.  They really were funny together and the show thrived on their relationship.  Through thick and thin, they worked together to make each other’s lives better and more miserable, as friends often do.

The show had all kinds of different comedy.  Rapid fire dialogue, tongue-in-cheek, self reflexive gags, sight gags, slapstick, you name it, Scrubs did it all well.  It was fun, fast and never seemed to run out of steam until the very end.  It kind of jumped the shark when they moved the setting from the hospital to a medical school in the 9th season and introduced a lot of new cast members but oh well.

The show was still fun and enjoyable and the cast members that remained were still having at it but some of them were beginning to move on to other things.  After 9 seasons and 182 episodes, it was time to move on anyway so I’m happy for them.


Share This Post
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •